Two Responsibilities

There are various ways of looking at religion. One is to consider what it does for us individually, another what it does for us collectively. Still another is what it calls us to do. From the latter viewpoint, there are again a number of ways of looking at the question, and the answers may vary slightly depending upon the religion you follow. It occurred to me recently that one way to answer the question is to consider two key responsibilities our religions assign to us: teaching and service.

Consider that Jesus called His disciples to become “fishers of men,” and that He sent them out into the world to proclaim the Gospel. It is said that when the Buddha attained enlightenment, the world hung in the balance until He determined to go out and teach others what He had learned.  Baha’u’llah states it explicitly for His followers:

The Pen of the Most High hath decreed and imposed upon every one the obligation to teach this Cause…. God will, no doubt, inspire whosoever detacheth himself from all else but Him, and will cause the pure waters of wisdom and utterance to gush out and flow copiously from his heart. Verily, thy Lord, the All-Merciful, is powerful to do as He willeth, and ordaineth whatsoever He pleaseth.
(Baha’u’llah, Gleanings from the Writings of Baha’u’llah, CXLIV, p. 313)

But teaching goes beyond carrying the Message to those who have not yet heard it. There is also the obligation to learn, or as Baha’u’llah puts it, to teach one’s own self. Also, there is the obligation to teach one’s children, not only in religion but in the arts and sciences they will need in the course of their lives. Teaching is a very big word.

Likewise with service. As with teaching, it can signify a number of things: service to God, service to others, service to “the world of humanity.” ‘Abdu’l-Baha often spoke of the latter. For example:

Soon will your swiftly-passing days be over, and the fame and riches, the comforts, the joys provided by this rubbish-heap, the world, will be gone without a trace. Summon ye, then, the people to God, and invite humanity to follow the example of the Company on high. Be ye loving fathers to the orphan, and a refuge to the helpless, and a treasury for the poor, and a cure for the ailing. Be ye the helpers of every victim of oppression, the patrons of the disadvantaged. Think ye at all times of rendering some service to every member of the human race. Pay ye no heed to aversion and rejection, to disdain, hostility, injustice: act ye in the opposite way. Be ye sincerely kind, not in appearance only. Let each one of God’s loved ones centre his attention on this: to be the Lord’s mercy to man; to be the Lord’s grace. Let him do some good to every person whose path he crosseth, and be of some benefit to him. Let him improve the character of each and all, and reorient the minds of men. In this way, the light of divine guidance will shine forth, and the blessings of God will cradle all mankind: for love is light, no matter in what abode it dwelleth; and hate is darkness, no matter where it may make its nest. O friends of God! That the hidden Mystery may stand revealed, and the secret essence of all things may be disclosed, strive ye to banish that darkness for ever and ever.
(‘Abdu’l-Baha, Selections from the Writings of ‘Abdu’l-Baha, #1, p. 3)

Interestingly, the two obligations of teaching and service are intimately bound up with each other, for as ‘Abdu’l-Baha says above, being of true service to others helps to spread the light of God, and teaching itself is a form of service to God.

So a great deal is bound up in those two words, and indeed they offer a surprisingly deep view of the meaning and purpose of religion.